Debris Free Oceans Dream Team Inspires floatopians to leave only footprints behind at floatopia miami 2015

The Debris Free Oceans Dream Team collaborated with VolunteerCleanup.org to transform Floatopia into Cleantopia. Over 8,000 floatopians squeezed themselves onto that little slice of heavenly beach south of 5th street. Historically, a disastrous event for the beach and ocean environments, the Floatopia Green Team decided to make a change. The Green Team inspired beachgoers to cleanup after hemselves and to assist the volunteers in cleaning up the beach so that Floatopia can continue to be a positive and uplifting cultural event for years to come. The Green Team floated through the crowds with a "Trash Float" and provided additional, more convenient trash bins for the floatopians on the shore. This significantly decreased litter from past years, and the Green Team cannot wait to grow its efforts next year so that, literally, only footprints are left behind. See more photos here: http://www.wannaforkmiami.com/#!Floatopia-AKA-Cleantopia/cla2/5532f5240cf2784deac5ed2c

The Debris Free Oceans Dream Team collaborated with VolunteerCleanup.org to transform Floatopia into Cleantopia. Over 8,000 floatopians squeezed themselves onto that little slice of heavenly beach south of 5th street. Historically, a disastrous event for the beach and ocean environments, the Floatopia Green Team decided to make a change. The Green Team inspired beachgoers to cleanup after hemselves and to assist the volunteers in cleaning up the beach so that Floatopia can continue to be a positive and uplifting cultural event for years to come. The Green Team floated through the crowds with a "Trash Float" and provided additional, more convenient trash bins for the floatopians on the shore. This significantly decreased litter from past years, and the Green Team cannot wait to grow its efforts next year so that, literally, only footprints are left behind. See more photos here: http://www.wannaforkmiami.com/#!Floatopia-AKA-Cleantopia/cla2/5532f5240cf2784deac5ed2c

pts gives back by collecting over 400 lbs. of trash in biscayne bay, fl

Palmer Trinity (PTS) high-school students and parents collected 400 pounds of plastic and styrofoam from an island in Biscayne Bay this past PTS Gives Back Day 2014. Sponsored by Miami water-sport company, Beach Paddle Co., the day began with a pontoon boat ride from Morningside Park to the island. Before the cleanup, students were asked to observe whether the trash had bite marks from fish or birds, question where each piece of trash may have originated from, and realize whether the student had personally used and disposed of the item before. During the cleanup, students found nearly a thousand bottle caps and straws as well as larger items, like pieces to cars and large PVC pipes. After the cleanup, students snorkeled and went standup paddle boarding around the island, which the students named “Debris Free Island.”  Before taking the Beach Paddle Co. vessel back to the mainland, the Educational Director from Debris Free Oceans, Tracy Nolan, wrapped up the day with a short educational overview about the global issue of plastics waste and marine debris. Tracy highlighted that 80% of the trash we collected originated from land because our landfills are nearly full and beginning to overflow. Tracy connected this waste management issue with our personal habits like consuming and quickly disposing of single-use plastics, which scientists estimate enter our waters by the millions of tons each year. Students created their own solutions to the global issue, which included bringing your own reusable bags to stores, asking for no straw or using a reusable glass straw at restaurants, and carrying a reusable bottle or mug to refill with tap water or coffee.

Palmer Trinity (PTS) high-school students and parents collected 400 pounds of plastic and styrofoam from an island in Biscayne Bay this past PTS Gives Back Day 2014. Sponsored by Miami water-sport company, Beach Paddle Co., the day began with a pontoon boat ride from Morningside Park to the island. Before the cleanup, students were asked to observe whether the trash had bite marks from fish or birds, question where each piece of trash may have originated from, and realize whether the student had personally used and disposed of the item before. During the cleanup, students found nearly a thousand bottle caps and straws as well as larger items, like pieces to cars and large PVC pipes. After the cleanup, students snorkeled and went standup paddle boarding around the island, which the students named “Debris Free Island.”  Before taking the Beach Paddle Co. vessel back to the mainland, the Educational Director from Debris Free Oceans, Tracy Nolan, wrapped up the day with a short educational overview about the global issue of plastics waste and marine debris. Tracy highlighted that 80% of the trash we collected originated from land because our landfills are nearly full and beginning to overflow. Tracy connected this waste management issue with our personal habits like consuming and quickly disposing of single-use plastics, which scientists estimate enter our waters by the millions of tons each year. Students created their own solutions to the global issue, which included bringing your own reusable bags to stores, asking for no straw or using a reusable glass straw at restaurants, and carrying a reusable bottle or mug to refill with tap water or coffee.

Plastics Lifecycle Education initiated at local Highschool

Debris Free educators are collaborating with local Miami high school, Palmer Trinity, to implement an interdisciplinary curriculum  about the lifecycle of plastics in order to spur innovation from our future leaders. Photographed above, Debris Free Ocean's Co-founder Caiti Pomerance inspires classes at Palmer Trinity to become an integral part to the marine debris solution.

Debris Free educators are collaborating with local Miami high school, Palmer Trinity, to implement an interdisciplinary curriculum  about the lifecycle of plastics in order to spur innovation from our future leaders. Photographed above, Debris Free Ocean's Co-founder Caiti Pomerance inspires classes at Palmer Trinity to become an integral part to the marine debris solution.

International Coastal Cleanup at Miami Beach, Florida

For 25 years, the Ocean Conservancy has compiled data from cleanup sites around the world on International Coastal Cleanup Day. This data furthers our understanding of marine debris distribution patterns and physical makeup. On September 20, 2014, the Debris Free Oceans crew had a beach day (per usual with some surfboards) and cleaned up our beach to support this amazing citizen science initiative.

For 25 years, the Ocean Conservancy has compiled data from cleanup sites around the world on International Coastal Cleanup Day. This data furthers our understanding of marine debris distribution patterns and physical makeup. On September 20, 2014, the Debris Free Oceans crew had a beach day (per usual with some surfboards) and cleaned up our beach to support this amazing citizen science initiative.


No waste policy implemented at yoga studio in South Miami, Florida

Debris Free sustainability consultants recently inspired a yoga studio, Green Monkey, in South Miami, Florida to initiate a zero-waste policy at its location. First, our consultants focused on eliminating the studio's plastic waste from the plastic's source by facilitating a shift from the sale of single-use plastic water bottles to the implementation of a water fountain that may be used to refill reusable water bottles. Second, our consultants inspired the use of recycle bins to recapture the waste that otherwise would be admitted into the waste stream. 

Debris Free sustainability consultants recently inspired a yoga studio, Green Monkey, in South Miami, Florida to initiate a zero-waste policy at its location. First, our consultants focused on eliminating the studio's plastic waste from the plastic's source by facilitating a shift from the sale of single-use plastic water bottles to the implementation of a water fountain that may be used to refill reusable water bottles. Second, our consultants inspired the use of recycle bins to recapture the waste that otherwise would be admitted into the waste stream. 


Beach Cleanup at Key Biscayne, Florida and Kayak Cleanup at Gainesville, Florida

Debris Free recovered 30 square feet of trash from Key Biscayne, Florida last week, at an average of 1 square foot of trash for every 10X12 square foot of beach! This included 38 bottles and 23 straws. BYO Reusable Bottle and Ditch the Straw for debris free beaches, reefs, and oceans! This past weekend, Debris Free cleaned as they kayaked, which resulted in the removal of over 25 square feet of trash from one of Gainesville's most beloved water bodies!

Debris Free recovered 30 square feet of trash from Key Biscayne, Florida last week, at an average of 1 square foot of trash for every 10X12 square foot of beach! This included 38 bottles and 23 straws. BYO Reusable Bottle and Ditch the Straw for debris free beaches, reefs, and oceans!

This past weekend, Debris Free cleaned as they kayaked, which resulted in the removal of over 25 square feet of trash from one of Gainesville's most beloved water bodies!